Networked Cities

Computer networks are merging with the physical infrastructure of the city in order to track how people use the city space.  This makes once passive objects, like streets, active producers of data informing decisions about urban planning and policy. Embedded sensors are currently producing a large amount of data.  The network technology can visualise city traffic flow, see where people move during the day, see how people use their cell phones as they are on the move, track criminal activity and allow us to communicate with one another. As Popupcity.net notes, “Often this data is not stored or collected. Often it is stored without being shared.”  We are just beginning to explore the possibilities of a networked city, where ”objects will cease being passive and evolve into being active, responding to activity happening in real time and facilitating and contributing to networks of social exchange and discourse, rearranging the rules of occupancy and patterns of mobility within the physical world.”

"We are surrounded by objects and spaces that have their own network and identity. their own informational shadow… Our urban places are increasingly becoming characterised in formats that are machine readable, human readable.  They are telling us about themselves. They are speaking themselves to us. We are surrounded by objects that are capable of gathering, processing, transmitting information." - Adam Greenfield

His company Urbanscale makes cities easier to understand, more pleasant to use and live in and more responsive to the desires of their inhabitants.

A talk from Adam Greenfield that gives a good overview of how public objects can be connected - click here to watch.

An essay presenting possibilities for the networked city:  A Manifesto for Networked Objects - Cohabitating with Pigeons, Arphids, Aibos in the Internet of Things

Networked Cities
Computer networks are merging with the physical infrastructure of the city in order to track how people use the city space.  This makes once passive objects, like streets, active producers of data informing decisions about urban planning and policy. Embedded sensors are currently producing a large amount of data.  The network technology can visualise city traffic flow, see where people move during the day, see how people use their cell phones as they are on the move, track criminal activity and allow us to communicate with one another. As Popupcity.net notes, “Often this data is not stored or collected. Often it is stored without being shared.”  We are just beginning to explore the possibilities of a networked city, where ”objects will cease being passive and evolve into being active, responding to activity happening in real time and facilitating and contributing to networks of social exchange and discourse, rearranging the rules of occupancy and patterns of mobility within the physical world.”
"We are surrounded by objects and spaces that have their own network and identity. their own informational shadow… Our urban places are increasingly becoming characterised in formats that are machine readable, human readable.  They are telling us about themselves. They are speaking themselves to us. We are surrounded by objects that are capable of gathering, processing, transmitting information." - Adam Greenfield
His company Urbanscale makes cities easier to understand, more pleasant to use and live in and more responsive to the desires of their inhabitants.
A talk from Adam Greenfield that gives a good overview of how public objects can be connected - click here to watch.
An essay presenting possibilities for the networked city:  A Manifesto for Networked Objects - Cohabitating with Pigeons, Arphids, Aibos in the Internet of Things

Airbnb: new community, new economy

Dream of a romantic pied a terre in the middle of the city? Want a quirky place to stay in style? Like cooking for yourself? Can’t afford a hotel? 

The images you see here are all places available to rent in BarcelonaHong KongNew York, Berlin, London for under $250 a night.

There are many reasons that someone might book a short term sublet apartment on AirBnb.  Somewhere between couch surfing and staying at a bed and breakfast, AirBnb has managed to create a new real world resource out of existing city space - apartments and houses already owned and occupied, but temporarily vacant.

The impact of this site on local urban economies has been astronomical with over 25,000 listings at the moment in 192 countries around the world.  Though the community of tenants and landlords connect online, the company is praised for creating a love for face to face relationships and mutual respect.  Lodgers can expect their host to give them tips about their favourite places in the neighbourhood and how to get around, travellers ask questions of their hosts that encourage them to see the city through new eyes.

An online community has created a bridge for a new type of international community, that shares space and information about their cities with one another.

As a company, we learned very early on that what makes collaborative consumption work, is trust.  To meet people in person, get to know them.  We opened those offices, not for marketing, not to grow the market that we already have in those cities - we actually opened them to better serve the existing hosts and travellers we have in those cities.  The more trust we can build, the better our platform and the better our marketplace will work." - Lukesic

TriplePundit: “Airbnb Builds Community, Not a Brand”

The Guardian: “Airbnb: grown up couch-surfing”

Financial Times: “Airbnb doubles bookings in half year”