The Great Escape
Norway’s capital city is thriving. And from its roots as a former shipyard to its modern urban reputation, the waters of Oslofjord frame a city that’s as beautiful as it is forward-thinking.
Learn more about one of Europe’s fastest developing cities in the latest edition of Audi Magazine: http://bit.ly/WinterAudiMagazine 
Audi Urban Future Awards
With increasing populations and a struggling transport infrastructure, urban mobility poses one of the greatest challenges of city life.

With this in mind, the 2012 Audi Urban Future Awards invited architects to come up with design solutions. Take a look at what they proposed with this album of images: http://on.fb.me/191TZE4

Raqs Media Collective

The Delhi-based trio Raqs Media Collective are Jeebesh Bagchi, Monica Narula and Shuddhabrata Sengupta. To describe them as artists doesn’t quite cut it. They make videos, high-tech objects, installations and online projects exploring a world reshaped by globalisation, from the blazing lights of India's rapaciously evolving cities to the shabby gloom of a Tyneside dock. Since they founded Sarai, their Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, in Delhi in 2000, they’ve reached far beyond art’s usual bounds, developing media projects with local communities, conducting urban research, editing a journal and curating international exhibitions.” - The Guardian

The Guardian: “Artist of the week 182: Raqs Media Collective”

(via artsquare)

Raqs Media Collective
“The Delhi-based trio Raqs Media Collective are Jeebesh Bagchi, Monica Narula and Shuddhabrata Sengupta. To describe them as artists doesn’t quite cut it. They make videos, high-tech objects, installations and online projects exploring a world reshaped by globalisation, from the blazing lights of India's rapaciously evolving cities to the shabby gloom of a Tyneside dock. Since they founded Sarai, their Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, in Delhi in 2000, they’ve reached far beyond art’s usual bounds, developing media projects with local communities, conducting urban research, editing a journal and curating international exhibitions.” - The Guardian
The Guardian: “Artist of the week 182: Raqs Media Collective”
Rio coming up
Rio de Janeiro, known for its beautiful beaches and hard bodies, will come into itsown as a truly global city when it hosts upcoming international events, including the 2012 Rio +20 Conference, the 2014 FIFA World Cup and the 2016 Olympic Games. 
London tube map
"The tube map is something we all take for granted and rarely consider its origins. Ever wondered who came up with the seamless (but maybe not geographically accurate) design? Well, it was a chap called Harry Beck who was hired to redesign the map in 1931. Some could compare Beck’s approach to the London Underground to Steve Jobs’ vision of computers: ‘what do people need and how do we make it simple?’ as he ditched the curved lines and natural bends and implemented a simple grid-like system making the map easier to read. His first design (above) was rejected leading him to design a map very similar to the one we now know and love. But that’s just the tip of the iceberg. The London Transport Museum is hosting a season of talks and events discussing the evolution of the tube map, contemporary art, a Piccadilly Line walking tour and much more. Be sure to check out the exhibition and to book quickly so you don’t miss out." Carly-Ann Clements, Time Out

Networked Cities

Computer networks are merging with the physical infrastructure of the city in order to track how people use the city space.  This makes once passive objects, like streets, active producers of data informing decisions about urban planning and policy. Embedded sensors are currently producing a large amount of data.  The network technology can visualise city traffic flow, see where people move during the day, see how people use their cell phones as they are on the move, track criminal activity and allow us to communicate with one another. As Popupcity.net notes, “Often this data is not stored or collected. Often it is stored without being shared.”  We are just beginning to explore the possibilities of a networked city, where ”objects will cease being passive and evolve into being active, responding to activity happening in real time and facilitating and contributing to networks of social exchange and discourse, rearranging the rules of occupancy and patterns of mobility within the physical world.”

"We are surrounded by objects and spaces that have their own network and identity. their own informational shadow… Our urban places are increasingly becoming characterised in formats that are machine readable, human readable.  They are telling us about themselves. They are speaking themselves to us. We are surrounded by objects that are capable of gathering, processing, transmitting information." - Adam Greenfield

His company Urbanscale makes cities easier to understand, more pleasant to use and live in and more responsive to the desires of their inhabitants.

A talk from Adam Greenfield that gives a good overview of how public objects can be connected - click here to watch.

An essay presenting possibilities for the networked city:  A Manifesto for Networked Objects - Cohabitating with Pigeons, Arphids, Aibos in the Internet of Things

Networked Cities
Computer networks are merging with the physical infrastructure of the city in order to track how people use the city space.  This makes once passive objects, like streets, active producers of data informing decisions about urban planning and policy. Embedded sensors are currently producing a large amount of data.  The network technology can visualise city traffic flow, see where people move during the day, see how people use their cell phones as they are on the move, track criminal activity and allow us to communicate with one another. As Popupcity.net notes, “Often this data is not stored or collected. Often it is stored without being shared.”  We are just beginning to explore the possibilities of a networked city, where ”objects will cease being passive and evolve into being active, responding to activity happening in real time and facilitating and contributing to networks of social exchange and discourse, rearranging the rules of occupancy and patterns of mobility within the physical world.”
"We are surrounded by objects and spaces that have their own network and identity. their own informational shadow… Our urban places are increasingly becoming characterised in formats that are machine readable, human readable.  They are telling us about themselves. They are speaking themselves to us. We are surrounded by objects that are capable of gathering, processing, transmitting information." - Adam Greenfield
His company Urbanscale makes cities easier to understand, more pleasant to use and live in and more responsive to the desires of their inhabitants.
A talk from Adam Greenfield that gives a good overview of how public objects can be connected - click here to watch.
An essay presenting possibilities for the networked city:  A Manifesto for Networked Objects - Cohabitating with Pigeons, Arphids, Aibos in the Internet of Things

Reading on the City, Crash Course

These three books represent disparate interpretations of the city.  What is the role of the city in our global economy, daily life, and cultural development? How do the decisions of city planners effect quality of life for city dwellers?  Each of these books is a classic, taught in university Urban Studies courses around the world. For a good read and a deeper understanding of how the rise of the city is a phenomenon that is rapidly changing the history of the human race.

Saskia Sassen, “The Global City”

This classic work chronicles how New York, London, and Tokyo became command centers for the global economy and in the process underwent a series of massive and parallel changes. What distinguishes Sassen’s theoretical framework is the emphasis on the formation of cross-border dynamics through which these cities and the growing number of other global cities begin to form strategic transnational networks. All the core data in this new edition have been updated, while the preface and epilogue discuss the relevant trends in globalization since the book originally came out in 1991.

Mike Davis, “City of Quartz: Excavating the Future in Los Angeles”

No metropolis has been more loved or more hated. To its official boosters, “Los Angeles brings it all together.” To detractors, LA is a sunlit mortuary where “you can rot without feeling it.” To Mike Davis, the author of this fiercely elegant and wide- ranging work of social history, Los Angeles is both utopia and dystopia, a place where the last Joshua trees are being plowed under to make room for model communities in the desert, where the rich have hired their own police to fend off street gangs, as well as armed Beirut militias. In City of Quartz, Davis reconstructs LA’s shadow history and dissects its ethereal economy. He tells us who has the power and how they hold on to it. He gives us a city of Dickensian extremes, Pynchonesque conspiracies, and a desperation straight out of Nathaniel Westa city in which we may glimpse our own future mirrored with terrifying clarity.  In this new edition, Davis provides a dazzling update on the city’s current status.

Jane Jacobs, “The Death and Life of Great American Cities”

The Death and Life of Great American Cities was described by The New York Times as “perhaps the most influential single work in the history of town planning… . [It] can also be seen in a much larger context. It is first of all a work of literature; the descriptions of street life as a kind of ballet and the bitingly satiric account of traditional planning theory can still be read for pleasure even by those who long ago absorbed and appropriated the book’s arguments.” Jane Jacobs, an editor and writer on architecture in New York City in the early sixties, argued that urban diversity and vitality were being destroyed by powerful architects and city planners. Rigorous, sane, and delightfully epigrammatic, Jane Jacobs’s tour de force is a blueprint for the humanistic management of cities. It remains sensible, knowledgeable, readable, and indispensable.