London tube map
"The tube map is something we all take for granted and rarely consider its origins. Ever wondered who came up with the seamless (but maybe not geographically accurate) design? Well, it was a chap called Harry Beck who was hired to redesign the map in 1931. Some could compare Beck’s approach to the London Underground to Steve Jobs’ vision of computers: ‘what do people need and how do we make it simple?’ as he ditched the curved lines and natural bends and implemented a simple grid-like system making the map easier to read. His first design (above) was rejected leading him to design a map very similar to the one we now know and love. But that’s just the tip of the iceberg. The London Transport Museum is hosting a season of talks and events discussing the evolution of the tube map, contemporary art, a Piccadilly Line walking tour and much more. Be sure to check out the exhibition and to book quickly so you don’t miss out." Carly-Ann Clements, Time Out
Light Cube

To date, 528 people have travelled in space. But over 529 soon to be astronauts have put down deposits to travel 68 miles above the Earth’s surface.  There are reports that celebrities such as Ashton Kutcher, Brad Pitt, Angelina Jolie, Tom Hanks and Katy Perry have signed up.

Branson’s tickets to space cost $200K, but he is by no means the only player.  Excalibur Almaz plans to take people on six month long journeys around the moon for the price of $155 million.  In March, the FAA predicted that private space travel will become a billon-dollar industry within the next decade.  

Will space become the new pit stop for the jet set?


Space Cadet
More people have now signed up for suborbital flights aboard Richard Branson’s SpaceShipTwo than have ever been in space.

To date, 528 people have travelled in space. But over 529 soon to be astronauts have put down deposits to travel 68 miles above the Earth’s surface.  There are reports that celebrities such as Ashton Kutcher, Brad Pitt, Angelina Jolie, Tom Hanks and Katy Perry have signed up.

Branson’s tickets to space cost $200K, but he is by no means the only player.  Excalibur Almaz plans to take people on six month long journeys around the moon for the price of $155 million.  In March, the FAA predicted that private space travel will become a billon-dollar industry within the next decade.  

Will space become the new pit stop for the jet set?
What’s your favourite stadium?

Ampitheatre Lineage

What are the most epic and memorable structures of human history? You could say churches, mosques, castles, skyscrapers, but one structure that has remained with us is the stadium (ever since we had enough time to be entertained on mass scale).  From the Coliseum to the Hippodrome, the stadium is a great monument of human history.  In light of this summer’s games, Populous, designer of the London Olympic Stadium has sponsored a new exhibition at London’s Soane Museum that looks at the origin of these venues and how they have evolved.  Whether housing gladiator fights, football matches or Beyonce’s local fan base, the legacy of the stadium carries on.

Coolhunting.com: "Stadia: Sport and Vision in Architecture"

Sagmeister’s City Greeting Card
"My grandfather was educated in sign painting and I grew up with many of his pieces of wisdom around the house, traditional calligraphy carefully applied in gold leaf on painstakingly carved wooden panels.
One of his panels, still hanging in our hallway in Austria, reads:
This house is mine, and it isn’t mine
the second guy won’t own it either,
They will carry out the third one too,
so tell me, my friend, whose house is it?
I am just following this tradition with “Trying to look good limits my life”. The title of this work (and its content) is among the few things I have learned in my life so far (some of the others are: Having guts always works out for me and Everything I do always comes back to me).
Broken up into 5 parts Trying/to look/good/limits/my life and displayed in sequence as typographic billboards, they work like a sentimental greeting card left in a park north of Paris.”
- Stefan Sagmeister

Chris Cunningham x Audi City

Chris Cunningham is a relentlessly experimental creator who defies categorisation. His work is shaped by the sci-fi films and electronic music he devoured in his youth.  The frenetic, wildly inventive music videos he made for Aphex Twin ( “Windowlicker”, “Come to Daddy”) and Bjork ( “All Is Full of Love”) redefined the form and has influenced high fashion, advertising, blockbuster movies and low-budget horror flicks alike over the last decade.

In recent years he has moved further away from the music video genre and now creates independent video works, which no longer have their starting point as commissions. His video and sound art has been shown in the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Venice Bienalle, the Barbican, the Anthony D’offay gallery amongst others and his live show at The Royal Opera House, The Roundhouse and Royal Festival Hall.

Chris has created his own disturbing visual language, that pits the grotesque imperfections of human anatomy against high technology embodied in robots and hallucinatory motion effects.  

Always driven forward by its ethos of Vorsprung durch Technik, Audi City is a new venture that uses technology to create space in the city centre. For five days in Mayfair, Audi reveals a site-specific installation of Chris Cunningham’s latest work.  Enormous industrial robots veer around one another in a mysterious room.  Their motors are syncopated with the room’s metronome and they embark on a frenetic interchange over a mechanical ‘brain’. 

Stay tuned for more information on the installation and how YOU can win tickets to experience this artwork.

Follow us on Twitter here.

Chris Cunningham x Audi City
Chris Cunningham is a relentlessly experimental creator who defies categorisation. His work is shaped by the sci-fi films and electronic music he devoured in his youth.  The frenetic, wildly inventive music videos he made for Aphex Twin ( “Windowlicker”, “Come to Daddy”) and Bjork ( “All Is Full of Love”) redefined the form and has influenced high fashion, advertising, blockbuster movies and low-budget horror flicks alike over the last decade.
In recent years he has moved further away from the music video genre and now creates independent video works, which no longer have their starting point as commissions. His video and sound art has been shown in the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Venice Bienalle, the Barbican, the Anthony D’offay gallery amongst others and his live show at The Royal Opera House, The Roundhouse and Royal Festival Hall.
Chris has created his own disturbing visual language, that pits the grotesque imperfections of human anatomy against high technology embodied in robots and hallucinatory motion effects.  
Always driven forward by its ethos of Vorsprung durch Technik, Audi City is a new venture that uses technology to create space in the city centre. For five days in Mayfair, Audi reveals a site-specific installation of Chris Cunningham’s latest work.  Enormous industrial robots veer around one another in a mysterious room.  Their motors are syncopated with the room’s metronome and they embark on a frenetic interchange over a mechanical ‘brain’. 
Stay tuned for more information on the installation and how YOU can win tickets to experience this artwork.
Follow us on Twitter here.