Thomas Demand Autobahn
"Photographs can seem convincingly real or strangely artificial. The work of German photographer Thomas Demand achieves a disquieting balance between the two. Born in 1964, Demand began as a sculptor and took up photography to record his ephemeral paper constructions. In 1993 he turned the tables, henceforth making constructions for the sole purpose of photographing them. Demand begins with a preexisting image culled from the media, usually of a political event, which he translates into a life-size model made of colored paper and cardboard. His handcrafted facsimiles of architectural spaces and natural environments are built in the image of other images. Thus, his photographs are triply removed from the scenes or objects they purport to depict. Once they have been photographed, the models are destroyed." - MOMA
kummerbund:

Thomas Demand - Brenner Autobahn
Light Cube

Auerbach’s RGB Colorspace Atlas

As part of an exhibition with MOMA entitled Ecstatic Alphabets/Heaps of Language, Tauba Auerbach has created a piece that visualises the RGB colour field in three dimensions, not too unlike a psychedelic stack of Post-Its.
"Human eyes typically have three types of colour receptor on their retinas, each sensitive to a different range of wavelengths of light. The colours associated with these wavelengths are approximately red, green, and blue. Because there are three types of colour receptor, it is possible to map the visible spectrum in a three-dimensional spatial model by assigning red, green, and blue each to a dimension. It is then possible to outline a cube in this space, where the values of red (R), green (G), and blue (B) are visible on a gradient scale of 0 to 100% in their respective directions. These gradients combine to create the RGB colour space cube, a volume in which any colour can be located by a set of three coordinates. RGB Colourspace Atlas, both a sculptural object and spatialisation of colour, consists of three books. Each volume contains the entire visible spectrum mapped out over 3,632 pages, representing the RGB cube sliced in a different direction: vertically, horizontally, and from front to back.” - MOMASee the video and more on the work on the MOMA microsite. 
Josef Schulz
A student of Dusseldorf photographers, Thomas Ruff and Bernhard Becher, Schulz focuses on the pristine forms of modern infrastructure in his series “formen”. 
What’s your favourite stadium?

100,000 staples make a city

ruineshumaines:

Ephemicropolis (2010) by Peter Root.

100,000 Staples
Approx floor area 600x300cm

Stacks of staples were broken into varying sizes from full stacks about 12cm high down to single staples. These stacks were then stood up and arranged over a period of 40 hours.

Click here to see feature in March 2012 issue of National Geographic Magazine and watch the video here.

Chris Cunningham x Audi City

Chris Cunningham is a relentlessly experimental creator who defies categorisation. His work is shaped by the sci-fi films and electronic music he devoured in his youth.  The frenetic, wildly inventive music videos he made for Aphex Twin ( “Windowlicker”, “Come to Daddy”) and Bjork ( “All Is Full of Love”) redefined the form and has influenced high fashion, advertising, blockbuster movies and low-budget horror flicks alike over the last decade.

In recent years he has moved further away from the music video genre and now creates independent video works, which no longer have their starting point as commissions. His video and sound art has been shown in the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Venice Bienalle, the Barbican, the Anthony D’offay gallery amongst others and his live show at The Royal Opera House, The Roundhouse and Royal Festival Hall.

Chris has created his own disturbing visual language, that pits the grotesque imperfections of human anatomy against high technology embodied in robots and hallucinatory motion effects.  

Always driven forward by its ethos of Vorsprung durch Technik, Audi City is a new venture that uses technology to create space in the city centre. For five days in Mayfair, Audi reveals a site-specific installation of Chris Cunningham’s latest work.  Enormous industrial robots veer around one another in a mysterious room.  Their motors are syncopated with the room’s metronome and they embark on a frenetic interchange over a mechanical ‘brain’. 

Stay tuned for more information on the installation and how YOU can win tickets to experience this artwork.

Follow us on Twitter here.

Chris Cunningham x Audi City
Chris Cunningham is a relentlessly experimental creator who defies categorisation. His work is shaped by the sci-fi films and electronic music he devoured in his youth.  The frenetic, wildly inventive music videos he made for Aphex Twin ( “Windowlicker”, “Come to Daddy”) and Bjork ( “All Is Full of Love”) redefined the form and has influenced high fashion, advertising, blockbuster movies and low-budget horror flicks alike over the last decade.
In recent years he has moved further away from the music video genre and now creates independent video works, which no longer have their starting point as commissions. His video and sound art has been shown in the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Venice Bienalle, the Barbican, the Anthony D’offay gallery amongst others and his live show at The Royal Opera House, The Roundhouse and Royal Festival Hall.
Chris has created his own disturbing visual language, that pits the grotesque imperfections of human anatomy against high technology embodied in robots and hallucinatory motion effects.  
Always driven forward by its ethos of Vorsprung durch Technik, Audi City is a new venture that uses technology to create space in the city centre. For five days in Mayfair, Audi reveals a site-specific installation of Chris Cunningham’s latest work.  Enormous industrial robots veer around one another in a mysterious room.  Their motors are syncopated with the room’s metronome and they embark on a frenetic interchange over a mechanical ‘brain’. 
Stay tuned for more information on the installation and how YOU can win tickets to experience this artwork.
Follow us on Twitter here.

Light of Other Days

Both born in Switzerland in 1979, Taiyo Onorato & Nico Krebs met in at the School of Art and Design in Zürich in 2005.  They have worked together on several different projects and often collaborate with Bernard Willhelm, the wildly innovative fashion Antwerp trained fashion designer.

This series of direct positive photographs is entitled Light of Other Days. It is testament to the imperfect capture of light that is photography.  Their work verges on the edge of photography, sculpture and installation, examining the two dimensional limitations of photography and how the placement of objects in space can lead to a fictional and humorous interplay.  Each shot is meticulously crafted, staged and lit.  

Their book, The Great Unreal (2009) lead to a show at MOMA PS1, and is a take on the cliche of the American road trip, both intelligent and absurdist.

Their website

MOMA PS1 show

Nowness: “Tall Tales”

A sculpture that lives and dies

The Pulse Machine is a sculpture made up of a kick drum, solenoid, flip digit numerals, Arduino microcontroller and other mixed media.  

Pulse Machine from Alicia Eggert on Vimeo.

This electromechanical sculpture was ‘born’ in Nashville, Tennessee on 2 June 2012, at 6:18 PM. It has been programmed to have the average human lifespan of babies born in Tennessee on that same day: approximately 78 years. The kick drum beats its heartbeat (at 60 beats per minute), and the mechanical counter displays the number of heartbeats remaining in its lifetime. An internal, battery-operated clock keeps track of the passing time when the sculpture is unplugged. The sculpture will die once the counter reaches zero.