Ballerina Project
The Ballerina Project grew from the idea of New York City as a magnet for creativity; each photograph is a collaborative work of dance, fashion design and photography played out against the city’s landscape.To find out more about the Ballerina Project please follow our blog: http://ballerinaproject.com/about

New Stage for Dance - your iPad?

2wice, a visual and performing arts journal, is going digital. But not just putting print on a screen. The dance publication is producing performance art pieces made specifically to be experienced on the iPad.  Each performance is uniquely packaged in an app. 

2wice Fifth Wall App from Pentagram on Vimeo.

Patsy Tarr, director of the 2wice Arts Foundation, believes dance needs to go in the direction of mobile technology. The organization chose the iPad as their vehicle of change.

“The greatest thing that digital could add is the incorporation of video,” Tarr says. “And for dance, that’s just the whole thing. Instead of describing the dance in print in writing and a photograph, we could actually just show the dance.”

2wice released the Fifth Wall app in the Apple store (99 cents). For the production of Fifth Wall, black wooden planks were nailed together to make a sturdy rectangular box, proportional to the iPad’s miniature frame. The piece was then shot within this bespoke stage to translate to the digital format. The concept of Fifth Wall was dreamed up by 2wice’s art director Abbott Miller. The dance was choreographed and performed by Jonah Bokaer. 

The end result is a very interactive experience. By downloading the Fifth Wall app, iPad users can access four two-minute performances, which can be enjoyed individually or simultaneously.

The 2wice Arts Foundation is a nonprofit organization that supports the visual and performing arts. The Foundation, which began in 1989, has its headquarters in the legendary New York City Center. The work of the Foundation is to publish digital and print projects that focus on the intersection of photography, dance, design, performance, fashion, art and architecture.

Mobile Apps News: "Former print publication now produces iPad only performance art"

New Stage for Dance - your iPad?
2wice, a visual and performing arts journal, is going digital. But not just putting print on a screen. The dance publication is producing performance art pieces made specifically to be experienced on the iPad.  Each performance is uniquely packaged in an app. 

2wice Fifth Wall App from Pentagram on Vimeo.
Patsy Tarr, director of the 2wice Arts Foundation, believes dance needs to go in the direction of mobile technology. The organization chose the iPad as their vehicle of change.
“The greatest thing that digital could add is the incorporation of video,” Tarr says. “And for dance, that’s just the whole thing. Instead of describing the dance in print in writing and a photograph, we could actually just show the dance.”
2wice released the Fifth Wall app in the Apple store (99 cents). For the production of Fifth Wall, black wooden planks were nailed together to make a sturdy rectangular box, proportional to the iPad’s miniature frame. The piece was then shot within this bespoke stage to translate to the digital format. The concept of Fifth Wall was dreamed up by 2wice’s art director Abbott Miller. The dance was choreographed and performed by Jonah Bokaer. 
The end result is a very interactive experience. By downloading the Fifth Wall app, iPad users can access four two-minute performances, which can be enjoyed individually or simultaneously.
The 2wice Arts Foundation is a nonprofit organization that supports the visual and performing arts. The Foundation, which began in 1989, has its headquarters in the legendary New York City Center. The work of the Foundation is to publish digital and print projects that focus on the intersection of photography, dance, design, performance, fashion, art and architecture.
Mobile Apps News: "Former print publication now produces iPad only performance art"

Dome Interpretation

The Hala Stulecia or “Centennial Hall" is a piece of historic architecture located in Wroclaw, Poland.  It was built in 1911-13, as one of the first and most astounding structures to artistically utilise reinforced concrete.  The undulating and interwoven concrete quatrefoil forms a massive dome.  Max Berg, the architect, pushed the possibilities of the reinforced concrete material in a way that had never been done before.

The visual design lab AntiVJ has created a site specific, light and sound installation that fully embraces the mind boggling architecture.  They focused on the original architectural blueprints, as well as sci-fi cinematic references such as Fritz Lang’s Metropolis from the 1920s to Tron from the 1980s.

The installation is a contemporary update, harnessing the inherent movement implied by its form.  The UNESCO listed building has been given new life by this incredible interconnection between light and sound.

Be sure to watch the making of here

(via the-gasoline-station)

Dome Interpretation
The Hala Stulecia or “Centennial Hall" is a piece of historic architecture located in Wroclaw, Poland.  It was built in 1911-13, as one of the first and most astounding structures to artistically utilise reinforced concrete.  The undulating and interwoven concrete quatrefoil forms a massive dome.  Max Berg, the architect, pushed the possibilities of the reinforced concrete material in a way that had never been done before.
The visual design lab AntiVJ has created a site specific, light and sound installation that fully embraces the mind boggling architecture.  They focused on the original architectural blueprints, as well as sci-fi cinematic references such as Fritz Lang’s Metropolis from the 1920s to Tron from the 1980s.
The installation is a contemporary update, harnessing the inherent movement implied by its form.  The UNESCO listed building has been given new life by this incredible interconnection between light and sound.
Be sure to watch the making of here. 

Light of Other Days

Both born in Switzerland in 1979, Taiyo Onorato & Nico Krebs met in at the School of Art and Design in Zürich in 2005.  They have worked together on several different projects and often collaborate with Bernard Willhelm, the wildly innovative fashion Antwerp trained fashion designer.

This series of direct positive photographs is entitled Light of Other Days. It is testament to the imperfect capture of light that is photography.  Their work verges on the edge of photography, sculpture and installation, examining the two dimensional limitations of photography and how the placement of objects in space can lead to a fictional and humorous interplay.  Each shot is meticulously crafted, staged and lit.  

Their book, The Great Unreal (2009) lead to a show at MOMA PS1, and is a take on the cliche of the American road trip, both intelligent and absurdist.

Their website

MOMA PS1 show

Nowness: “Tall Tales”

Shobana Jeyasingh, a prominent modern dance choreographer has long been creating dances in incredible spaces. Her new work is a mesmerising series of dances called Too Mortal, will take place in historic churches around Europe.  Rather than use the architecture of the church as a setting, Jeyasignh says it is more like a dance partner, instead of “site specific” the work is “site reactive.”

"The church is like something from a Jane Austen novel with these very tall, very dark, box pews… I’ve always envied film directors because they can make clean cuts between images.  In dance, when you create an image, you have to spend a lot of time thinking about how to get out of it.  The dancers have to physically untangle themselves and move on.  With these box pews, I realised I could edit in a new way.  I could instantly make the dancers appear and disappear." - Shobana Jeyasingh

The Guardian: “Shake the room: how architecture is inspiring dance”

Shobana Jeyasingh, a prominent modern dance choreographer has long been creating dances in incredible spaces. Her new work is a mesmerising series of dances called Too Mortal, will take place in historic churches around Europe.  Rather than use the architecture of the church as a setting, Jeyasignh says it is more like a dance partner, instead of “site specific” the work is “site reactive.”
"The church is like something from a Jane Austen novel with these very tall, very dark, box pews… I’ve always envied film directors because they can make clean cuts between images.  In dance, when you create an image, you have to spend a lot of time thinking about how to get out of it.  The dancers have to physically untangle themselves and move on.  With these box pews, I realised I could edit in a new way.  I could instantly make the dancers appear and disappear." - Shobana Jeyasingh
The Guardian: “Shake the room: how architecture is inspiring dance”
Changing Lanes
Finger Fly

Leap, say goodbye to keyboard and mouse

technologizm:

     New amazing way to interaction with computer.

     I call this: infinite leap

     They say about yourself:

Say goodbye to your mouse and keyboard.

Leap represents an entirely new way to interact with your computers. It’s more accurate than a mouse, as reliable as a keyboard and more sensitive than a touchscreen.  For the first time, you can control a computer in three dimensions with your natural hand and finger movements.

This isn’t a game system that roughly maps your hand movements.  The Leap technology is 200 times more accurate than anything else on the market — at any price point. Just about the size of a flash drive, the Leap can distinguish your individual fingers and track your movements down to a 1/100th of a millimeter.

This is like day one of the mouse.  Except, no one needs an instruction manual for their hands.