Technical function in material

Check out our previous post to learn more about this incredible “breathing” sculpture from Steffen Reichert that is currently showing at the Pompidou.

Climate-responsiveness in architecture is typically conceived as a technical function enabled by myriad mechanical and electronic sensing, actuating and regulating devices. In contrast to this superimposition of high-tech equipment on otherwise inert material, nature suggests a fundamentally different, no-tech strategy: In many biological systems the responsive capacity is quite literally ingrained in the material itself.

This project employs similar design strategies of physically programming a material system that neither requires any kind of mechanical or electronic control, nor the supply of external energy. Here material computes form in feedback with the environment.

- From Steffen Reichert’s website

Technical function in material
Check out our previous post to learn more about this incredible “breathing” sculpture from Steffen Reichert that is currently showing at the Pompidou.
Climate-responsiveness in architecture is typically conceived as a technical function enabled by myriad mechanical and electronic sensing, actuating and regulating devices. In contrast to this superimposition of high-tech equipment on otherwise inert material, nature suggests a fundamentally different, no-tech strategy: In many biological systems the responsive capacity is quite literally ingrained in the material itself.
This project employs similar design strategies of physically programming a material system that neither requires any kind of mechanical or electronic control, nor the supply of external energy. Here material computes form in feedback with the environment.
- From Steffen Reichert’s website

High Tech Haute Couture

We have all heard of high tech fabrics that can deflect bullets, keep us warm and wick away sweat.  However, high tech fabrics and high fashion are now united in an exhibition in Vienna entitled Technosensual: Where Fashion Meets Technology.

The more fantastical possibilities of smart textiles are on display here, laden unabashedly with LEDs and electronic sensors.  Similar to a networked city, garments can communicate and interact with people wearing and admiring them.  Dresses can mix cocktails, change color and play music or read poetry upon trigger of a sensor.  The innovative use of micro-technologies, the body, and familiar materials makes for some wildly extreme outfits. 

Anouk Wipprecht designed a dress called the Pseudomorph which is made of pristine white felt that dyes itself in a different way every time it is worn.  Bart Hess, frequent collaborator with Nick Knight and known for creating Lady Gaga's slime orgy in “Born this Way”, has a dress made of the viscous material.  Ricardo O’Nascimento was commissioned to make a gown embedded with 7 touch sensors and 4 speakers that can play overlapping aboriginal musical pieces as the wearer dances and moves.

The exhibition will be open from June 15th to September 2nd and is located at quartier21.

Willow Glass

On Wednesday, scientists unveiled “willow glass” the first flexible glass to reach the mass market.  The oxymoronic material is made by Corning Glass, the same company that made “gorilla glass” the indestructible glass used on the iPhone, that heralded the beginning of mass use of touch screen mobile devices.  The company says that the glass could be used for products that aren’t flat and on devices that are becoming increasingly slim.  Imagine consumer electronics that aren’t flat or that can bend and move!

Also astonishing is the technology that makes the glass more sustainably.  In essence, the glass can be produced at a stable temperature using a roll to roll process that looks like a newspaper printing machine.  

Corning Glass is written about in Steve Job’s biography. The story stands as an example of material innovation, as well as a classic example of Jobs pushing people to go beyond what they initially thought was possible.  Corning had invented gorilla glass in the 1960s but no one had a use for it, so they stopped making it.  Jobs had finished the design of the iPhone, but needed a surface that could endure every day handling, bumps and drops.  A board member put Jobs in touch with Wendell P. Weeks, the CEO of Corning.  After meeting, Jobs soon saw the potential for the material and ordered as much as possible within 6 months.  Weeks said that it was impossible, they didn’t have the capacity, none of their factories were making that kind of glass.  Jobs said, “Don’t be afraid.”  In six months, Weeks produced the glass.  Jobs sent him a message the day the iPhone launched that said, “We couldn’t have done it without you.”

BBC News, “Willow Glass: ultra-thin glass can ‘wrap’ around devices”

TechWorld, “‘Willow Glass’ screens to wrap around mobile devices”

Get the book: Steve Jobs, The Exclusive Biography by Walter Isaacson

Corning Museum of Glass

Willow Glass
On Wednesday, scientists unveiled “willow glass” the first flexible glass to reach the mass market.  The oxymoronic material is made by Corning Glass, the same company that made “gorilla glass” the indestructible glass used on the iPhone, that heralded the beginning of mass use of touch screen mobile devices.  The company says that the glass could be used for products that aren’t flat and on devices that are becoming increasingly slim.  Imagine consumer electronics that aren’t flat or that can bend and move!
Also astonishing is the technology that makes the glass more sustainably.  In essence, the glass can be produced at a stable temperature using a roll to roll process that looks like a newspaper printing machine.  

Corning Glass is written about in Steve Job’s biography. The story stands as an example of material innovation, as well as a classic example of Jobs pushing people to go beyond what they initially thought was possible.  Corning had invented gorilla glass in the 1960s but no one had a use for it, so they stopped making it.  Jobs had finished the design of the iPhone, but needed a surface that could endure every day handling, bumps and drops.  A board member put Jobs in touch with Wendell P. Weeks, the CEO of Corning.  After meeting, Jobs soon saw the potential for the material and ordered as much as possible within 6 months.  Weeks said that it was impossible, they didn’t have the capacity, none of their factories were making that kind of glass.  Jobs said, “Don’t be afraid.”  In six months, Weeks produced the glass.  Jobs sent him a message the day the iPhone launched that said, “We couldn’t have done it without you.”
BBC News, “Willow Glass: ultra-thin glass can ‘wrap’ around devices”
TechWorld, “‘Willow Glass’ screens to wrap around mobile devices”
Get the book: Steve Jobs, The Exclusive Biography by Walter Isaacson
Corning Museum of Glass

Paper Master

Jun Mitani has mastered of one of the most common materials of of the everyday office, paper.  His work riffs on the traditional art of paper folding, that we all know as origami. However, he uses paper to explore larger ideas  about how algorithms are used to depict 3-D shapes on computers. 

His main occupation is as a professor of computer science at the University of Tsukuba and he has developed a software called, ORI-REVO that allows one to visualise the complex folding of 3-D origami.

Recently, he collaborated with Issey Miyake for his 132.5 Collection that won the fashion prize for the Design Museum’s 2012 awards, competing against Sarah Burton’s Alexander McQueen wedding dress for the Duchess of Cambridge, Mary Katrantzou’s Ming vase and Faberge egg collection and the modular wood interior of exclusive fashion boutique LN-CC in Dalston.  The garments expanded from two dimensional fabrics into three dimensional forms.

Mitani’s work is being incorporated into a variety of other industrial design projects such as baking bowls!

Creator’s Project: “Jun Mitani is a Paper Magician: Constructing Unbelievable Origami Forms”

Wired: Jun Mitani, computer aided origami from Creator’s Project

Jun Mitani’s Flickr photostream

Crumpled Up: A Tumblr on paper art 

This gif was reblogged from dvdp:

Following Jun Mitani’s flickr photostream of his beautiful origami forms for a while. Check out his own design tool too. Here I found an interview.

Paper Master
Jun Mitani has mastered of one of the most common materials of of the everyday office, paper.  His work riffs on the traditional art of paper folding, that we all know as origami. However, he uses paper to explore larger ideas  about how algorithms are used to depict 3-D shapes on computers. 
His main occupation is as a professor of computer science at the University of Tsukuba and he has developed a software called, ORI-REVO that allows one to visualise the complex folding of 3-D origami.

Recently, he collaborated with Issey Miyake for his 132.5 Collection that won the fashion prize for the Design Museum’s 2012 awards, competing against Sarah Burton’s Alexander McQueen wedding dress for the Duchess of Cambridge, Mary Katrantzou’s Ming vase and Faberge egg collection and the modular wood interior of exclusive fashion boutique LN-CC in Dalston.  The garments expanded from two dimensional fabrics into three dimensional forms.
Mitani’s work is being incorporated into a variety of other industrial design projects such as baking bowls!
Creator’s Project: “Jun Mitani is a Paper Magician: Constructing Unbelievable Origami Forms”
Wired: Jun Mitani, computer aided origami from Creator’s Project
Jun Mitani’s Flickr photostream
Crumpled Up: A Tumblr on paper art 
This gif was reblogged from dvdp:

Following Jun Mitani’s flickr photostream of his beautiful origami forms for a while. Check out his own design tool too. Here I found an interview.