Interactive Olympic Tweet Wheel

Check out the colour of the London Eye to see what Twitter feels about the Olympics!

courtenaybird:

Happy Olympic tweeters to light up London Eye - Telegraph

[The team has] been commissioned to develop an intuitive algorithm to track the sentiment of British tweeters about the Olympics by EDF Energy, the official electricity supplier to London 2012, in order to create the ‘world’s first social media driven light show’, called ‘Energy of the Nation’ on the London Eye (which EDF sponsor).

If the overall sentiment is negative – the London Eye will glow purple. If it’s positive it will shine yellow and if the Twitter reaction to the Games is neutral, the wheel will emit green rays. 

Interactive Olympic Tweet Wheel
Check out the colour of the London Eye to see what Twitter feels about the Olympics!
courtenaybird:

Happy Olympic tweeters to light up London Eye - Telegraph

[The team has] been commissioned to develop an intuitive algorithm to track the sentiment of British tweeters about the Olympics by EDF Energy, the official electricity supplier to London 2012, in order to create the ‘world’s first social media driven light show’, called ‘Energy of the Nation’ on the London Eye (which EDF sponsor).
If the overall sentiment is negative – the London Eye will glow purple. If it’s positive it will shine yellow and if the Twitter reaction to the Games is neutral, the wheel will emit green rays. 
Beatmap
Throughout this Tumblr we’ve been exploring ideas of networked spaces, where software melds with infrastructure or the landscape to create a new experience of space.  This quirky project, Beatmap, integrates GPS, movement and techno freakout music to create geographically dictated mash-ups.
It makes the surface of the earth into a control surface.  Imagine how this technology can change our experience of moving around the planet, the possibilities are only just now being explored.

The world’s first interactive piano.

@StanleyPiano is the world’s first interactive player piano, makes his worldwide debut at Seattle’s Capitol Hill Block Party. Stanley is a precocious instrument who takes song requests via Twitter.  Stanley bares all as his moving parts (gears, bellows, hammers, valves) visibly work as the keys press themselves.

To make a request or chat with Stanley during the Block Party (July 20-22), simply tweet your song or message to @StanleyPiano. Fans will be notified when their song is up next and view the full list Block Party songs at stanleypiano.com. Stanley is very chatty, so all song requests are welcome. Ask him to play Freebird and see what happens.

Can’t make it to the Block Party? Enjoy Stanley online, where he’s streaming live all three days of the event—playing tracks for his fans around the world.

Introducing Stanley from DIGITAL KITCHEN on Vimeo.

The world’s first interactive piano.

Meet Stanley, an updated version of the jukebox. Instead of putting a quarter in, send a Tweet and instead of playing a record, his programmed hammers will bang out the tune on his piano keys. To see him in action, click here.
@StanleyPiano is the world’s first interactive player piano, makes his worldwide debut at Seattle’s Capitol Hill Block Party. Stanley is a precocious instrument who takes song requests via Twitter.  Stanley bares all as his moving parts (gears, bellows, hammers, valves) visibly work as the keys press themselves.To make a request or chat with Stanley during the Block Party (July 20-22), simply tweet your song or message to @StanleyPiano. Fans will be notified when their song is up next and view the full list Block Party songs at stanleypiano.com. Stanley is very chatty, so all song requests are welcome. Ask him to play Freebird and see what happens.Can’t make it to the Block Party? Enjoy Stanley online, where he’s streaming live all three days of the event—playing tracks for his fans around the world.

Introducing Stanley from DIGITAL KITCHEN on Vimeo.

New Stage for Dance - your iPad?

2wice, a visual and performing arts journal, is going digital. But not just putting print on a screen. The dance publication is producing performance art pieces made specifically to be experienced on the iPad.  Each performance is uniquely packaged in an app. 

2wice Fifth Wall App from Pentagram on Vimeo.

Patsy Tarr, director of the 2wice Arts Foundation, believes dance needs to go in the direction of mobile technology. The organization chose the iPad as their vehicle of change.

“The greatest thing that digital could add is the incorporation of video,” Tarr says. “And for dance, that’s just the whole thing. Instead of describing the dance in print in writing and a photograph, we could actually just show the dance.”

2wice released the Fifth Wall app in the Apple store (99 cents). For the production of Fifth Wall, black wooden planks were nailed together to make a sturdy rectangular box, proportional to the iPad’s miniature frame. The piece was then shot within this bespoke stage to translate to the digital format. The concept of Fifth Wall was dreamed up by 2wice’s art director Abbott Miller. The dance was choreographed and performed by Jonah Bokaer. 

The end result is a very interactive experience. By downloading the Fifth Wall app, iPad users can access four two-minute performances, which can be enjoyed individually or simultaneously.

The 2wice Arts Foundation is a nonprofit organization that supports the visual and performing arts. The Foundation, which began in 1989, has its headquarters in the legendary New York City Center. The work of the Foundation is to publish digital and print projects that focus on the intersection of photography, dance, design, performance, fashion, art and architecture.

Mobile Apps News: "Former print publication now produces iPad only performance art"

New Stage for Dance - your iPad?
2wice, a visual and performing arts journal, is going digital. But not just putting print on a screen. The dance publication is producing performance art pieces made specifically to be experienced on the iPad.  Each performance is uniquely packaged in an app. 

2wice Fifth Wall App from Pentagram on Vimeo.
Patsy Tarr, director of the 2wice Arts Foundation, believes dance needs to go in the direction of mobile technology. The organization chose the iPad as their vehicle of change.
“The greatest thing that digital could add is the incorporation of video,” Tarr says. “And for dance, that’s just the whole thing. Instead of describing the dance in print in writing and a photograph, we could actually just show the dance.”
2wice released the Fifth Wall app in the Apple store (99 cents). For the production of Fifth Wall, black wooden planks were nailed together to make a sturdy rectangular box, proportional to the iPad’s miniature frame. The piece was then shot within this bespoke stage to translate to the digital format. The concept of Fifth Wall was dreamed up by 2wice’s art director Abbott Miller. The dance was choreographed and performed by Jonah Bokaer. 
The end result is a very interactive experience. By downloading the Fifth Wall app, iPad users can access four two-minute performances, which can be enjoyed individually or simultaneously.
The 2wice Arts Foundation is a nonprofit organization that supports the visual and performing arts. The Foundation, which began in 1989, has its headquarters in the legendary New York City Center. The work of the Foundation is to publish digital and print projects that focus on the intersection of photography, dance, design, performance, fashion, art and architecture.
Mobile Apps News: "Former print publication now produces iPad only performance art"

Robo Newsflash

University of Tokyo researchers last week unveiled a robot that is designed to do just one thing: never lose a game of rock, paper, scissors. Here’s a look at what else is making news in the world of robotics, courtesy of The Courier-Mail

1. Exercise: If your dog can’t be bothered getting off the couch, here’s an alternative for a running mate. RMIT University researchers have developed the “Joggobot”, which flies alongside a jogger as a social companion. Joggobot is a “quadcopter”, which could make you the envy (or the victim of ridicule) of all the other runners.

2. Music: The Georgia Tech’s Centre for Music Technology last week unveiled Shimi, a musical assistant with speakers that bobs its head and taps to the beat. Shimi uses facial recognition to point his speakers in the right direction and recommends your next song. Going on sale next year for an undisclosed price.

3. Companions: A care facility in Osaka, Japan, is using an interactive robot modelled on a three-year-old boy that has a vocabulary of 400 words. The robot is designed to respond to cuddles and pats on the head and the centre director says the robot has proven particularly useful in comforting patients with dementia.

4. Waiters: It sounds like an outtake from Blade RunnerA restaurant in Harbin, China, has a staff of 18 robots that do everything from cook dumplings to serve the food. The greet robot says “Earth Person, Hello, Welcome to the Robot Restaurant” as you walk in the door, while a singing robot entertains you. Robot waiters have featured in novelty restaurants in China and Japan for more than 10 years.

5. Soldiers: ReconRobotics announced last week it had received a $14 million order from the US Government for 1000 miniature, throwable and mobile robots to be used by American soldiers in deployment in Afghanistan. The pocket-sized robots can be thrown 36m and are to be used in video reconnaissance.

6. Health workers: Bandit-II, a robot developed at the University of Southern California, is being used to help motivate paraplegics with their rehabilitation and guide them through exercises. The National Rehabilitation Centre in Los Angeles is conducting a study on the improvement of patients working with robots compared with those working with people.

8. Soccer: When the RoboCup competition was set up in 1997, the aim was to field a team of robots capable of winning against the human soccer World Cup champions by 2050. We’re not there yet, but last month’s RoboCup 2012 in Mexico City attracted thousands of participants, including this German team of programmed Nao robots.

9. Etiquette: Researchers at Silicon Valley robot developer Willow Garage are working with Pixar artists to teach robots good manners, from moving out of a person’s way when walking down a corridor to indicating that they are processing information by a verbal sign, such as scratching their head.

10. Acting: One of the robots at a robot exhibition in Taipei held last month was the humanoid robot RoboThespian. If he can be programmed to wait tables in his down time, he’ll be just like the real thing.

Leap, say goodbye to keyboard and mouse

technologizm:

     New amazing way to interaction with computer.

     I call this: infinite leap

     They say about yourself:

Say goodbye to your mouse and keyboard.

Leap represents an entirely new way to interact with your computers. It’s more accurate than a mouse, as reliable as a keyboard and more sensitive than a touchscreen.  For the first time, you can control a computer in three dimensions with your natural hand and finger movements.

This isn’t a game system that roughly maps your hand movements.  The Leap technology is 200 times more accurate than anything else on the market — at any price point. Just about the size of a flash drive, the Leap can distinguish your individual fingers and track your movements down to a 1/100th of a millimeter.

This is like day one of the mouse.  Except, no one needs an instruction manual for their hands.