Chris Cunningham


jaqapparatus 1 launches at Audi City London


From his formative years sculpting alien heads to his recent “jaqapparatus 1” robotic performance-art installation, seminal music video director-turned-artist Chris Cunningham retraces his varied and critically acclaimed career in this personal, self-directed short. One of an elite group of directors alongside Spike Jonze, Michel Gondry and Jonathan Glazer who redefined MTV in the 1990s, Cunningham elevated the pop promo to a burgeoning art form with daring and disturbing music videos for the likes of Aphex Twin, Björk and Madonna. While his peers graduated to the big screen, Cunningham went underground, quit making promos and commercials, and spent the best part of a decade experimenting with fusions of film, music, art and technology that culminated in a string of live audio-visual performances at festivals in Japan and Europe. For “jaqapparatus 1”, his first installation unveiled last month at the Audi City London high-tech concept store—a shadowy, sci-fi set involving two laser-firing robots locked in what seemed like a brutal mating ritual-cum-war—Cunningham cast two Talos motion-controlled camera rigs as his anthropomorphized protagonists. “Mounted on the robots heads are powerful lasers which they use to attack, repel and communicate with each other,” explains Cunningham, “a kind of duel, a surreal mating display which sees each machine trying to dominate the other.”

Chris Cunningham
jaqapparatus 1 launches at Audi City London

 From his formative years sculpting alien heads to his recent “jaqapparatus 1” robotic performance-art installation, seminal music video director-turned-artist Chris Cunningham retraces his varied and critically acclaimed career in this personal, self-directed short. One of an elite group of directors alongside Spike Jonze, Michel Gondry and Jonathan Glazer who redefined MTV in the 1990s, Cunningham elevated the pop promo to a burgeoning art form with daring and disturbing music videos for the likes of Aphex Twin, Björk and Madonna. While his peers graduated to the big screen, Cunningham went underground, quit making promos and commercials, and spent the best part of a decade experimenting with fusions of film, music, art and technology that culminated in a string of live audio-visual performances at festivals in Japan and Europe. For “jaqapparatus 1”, his first installation unveiled last month at the Audi City London high-tech concept store—a shadowy, sci-fi set involving two laser-firing robots locked in what seemed like a brutal mating ritual-cum-war—Cunningham cast two Talos motion-controlled camera rigs as his anthropomorphized protagonists. “Mounted on the robots heads are powerful lasers which they use to attack, repel and communicate with each other,” explains Cunningham, “a kind of duel, a surreal mating display which sees each machine trying to dominate the other.”
Portishead x Chris Cunningham
This GIF is a clip from Chris Cunningham’s music video for the song “Only You” by Portishead.  The film showed gravity defying ethereal movements. Beth Gibbons and a young boy were shot in underwater tanks and then digitally reinserted into a street scene.  The lack of any bubbles and distinct sharpness of the light, make it almost impossible to make sense of visually.
To get free tickets to see Chris Cunningham’s latest work at Audi City London on July 19th & 20th follow @audicity on Twitter.
See the full video here.
Sagmeister’s City Greeting Card
"My grandfather was educated in sign painting and I grew up with many of his pieces of wisdom around the house, traditional calligraphy carefully applied in gold leaf on painstakingly carved wooden panels.
One of his panels, still hanging in our hallway in Austria, reads:
This house is mine, and it isn’t mine
the second guy won’t own it either,
They will carry out the third one too,
so tell me, my friend, whose house is it?
I am just following this tradition with “Trying to look good limits my life”. The title of this work (and its content) is among the few things I have learned in my life so far (some of the others are: Having guts always works out for me and Everything I do always comes back to me).
Broken up into 5 parts Trying/to look/good/limits/my life and displayed in sequence as typographic billboards, they work like a sentimental greeting card left in a park north of Paris.”
- Stefan Sagmeister

Dome Interpretation

The Hala Stulecia or “Centennial Hall" is a piece of historic architecture located in Wroclaw, Poland.  It was built in 1911-13, as one of the first and most astounding structures to artistically utilise reinforced concrete.  The undulating and interwoven concrete quatrefoil forms a massive dome.  Max Berg, the architect, pushed the possibilities of the reinforced concrete material in a way that had never been done before.

The visual design lab AntiVJ has created a site specific, light and sound installation that fully embraces the mind boggling architecture.  They focused on the original architectural blueprints, as well as sci-fi cinematic references such as Fritz Lang’s Metropolis from the 1920s to Tron from the 1980s.

The installation is a contemporary update, harnessing the inherent movement implied by its form.  The UNESCO listed building has been given new life by this incredible interconnection between light and sound.

Be sure to watch the making of here

(via gasoline-station)

Dome Interpretation
The Hala Stulecia or “Centennial Hall" is a piece of historic architecture located in Wroclaw, Poland.  It was built in 1911-13, as one of the first and most astounding structures to artistically utilise reinforced concrete.  The undulating and interwoven concrete quatrefoil forms a massive dome.  Max Berg, the architect, pushed the possibilities of the reinforced concrete material in a way that had never been done before.
The visual design lab AntiVJ has created a site specific, light and sound installation that fully embraces the mind boggling architecture.  They focused on the original architectural blueprints, as well as sci-fi cinematic references such as Fritz Lang’s Metropolis from the 1920s to Tron from the 1980s.
The installation is a contemporary update, harnessing the inherent movement implied by its form.  The UNESCO listed building has been given new life by this incredible interconnection between light and sound.
Be sure to watch the making of here. 

Chris Cunningham x Audi City

Chris Cunningham is a relentlessly experimental creator who defies categorisation. His work is shaped by the sci-fi films and electronic music he devoured in his youth.  The frenetic, wildly inventive music videos he made for Aphex Twin ( “Windowlicker”, “Come to Daddy”) and Bjork ( “All Is Full of Love”) redefined the form and has influenced high fashion, advertising, blockbuster movies and low-budget horror flicks alike over the last decade.

In recent years he has moved further away from the music video genre and now creates independent video works, which no longer have their starting point as commissions. His video and sound art has been shown in the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Venice Bienalle, the Barbican, the Anthony D’offay gallery amongst others and his live show at The Royal Opera House, The Roundhouse and Royal Festival Hall.

Chris has created his own disturbing visual language, that pits the grotesque imperfections of human anatomy against high technology embodied in robots and hallucinatory motion effects.  

Always driven forward by its ethos of Vorsprung durch Technik, Audi City is a new venture that uses technology to create space in the city centre. For five days in Mayfair, Audi reveals a site-specific installation of Chris Cunningham’s latest work.  Enormous industrial robots veer around one another in a mysterious room.  Their motors are syncopated with the room’s metronome and they embark on a frenetic interchange over a mechanical ‘brain’. 

Stay tuned for more information on the installation and how YOU can win tickets to experience this artwork.

Follow us on Twitter here.

Chris Cunningham x Audi City
Chris Cunningham is a relentlessly experimental creator who defies categorisation. His work is shaped by the sci-fi films and electronic music he devoured in his youth.  The frenetic, wildly inventive music videos he made for Aphex Twin ( “Windowlicker”, “Come to Daddy”) and Bjork ( “All Is Full of Love”) redefined the form and has influenced high fashion, advertising, blockbuster movies and low-budget horror flicks alike over the last decade.
In recent years he has moved further away from the music video genre and now creates independent video works, which no longer have their starting point as commissions. His video and sound art has been shown in the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Venice Bienalle, the Barbican, the Anthony D’offay gallery amongst others and his live show at The Royal Opera House, The Roundhouse and Royal Festival Hall.
Chris has created his own disturbing visual language, that pits the grotesque imperfections of human anatomy against high technology embodied in robots and hallucinatory motion effects.  
Always driven forward by its ethos of Vorsprung durch Technik, Audi City is a new venture that uses technology to create space in the city centre. For five days in Mayfair, Audi reveals a site-specific installation of Chris Cunningham’s latest work.  Enormous industrial robots veer around one another in a mysterious room.  Their motors are syncopated with the room’s metronome and they embark on a frenetic interchange over a mechanical ‘brain’. 
Stay tuned for more information on the installation and how YOU can win tickets to experience this artwork.
Follow us on Twitter here.
Desert canyon in Times Square
The world is flush these days with museum quality white cube shows in both commercial gallery and institutional spaces.  But also on the rise are artworks that utilise the city’s infrastructure as both a method of display and as a medium.
Every day from 11:57 pm to midnight, a sweeping image of desert landscapes fill 36 of the large outdoor video screens lining Times Square, covering 63,500 square feet of screen space.  This time based work is entitled Buoy and is a luminous tribute to the Californian desert on the other side of the land mass.  Made by Seoungho Cho, the work reflects on the polar extremes of this desert, which was once the floor of a vast sea, now traversed by sight-seeing tourists.
The video work changes the cacophonic ad space into an immersive art installation, alluding that the city itself is a canyon, crevices winding through tall cliffs of surrounding skyscrapers.  
The ephemeral piece is just three minutes long and will be showing until June 30th.
Times Square website
Huffington Post: “Times Square Desert-Scape”
EAI in Times Square

Art in your city: orb cloud descends on Gehry parking structure

This work entitled Cradle by Ball-Nogues Studio uses the surrounding cityscape as it’s subject. It doesn’t depict city life, but literally reflects it, making a mirrored sculptural collage of all the traffic, pedestrians, buildings and street lamps.

pulmonaire:

Commissioned by the City of Santa Monica, Cradle is situated on the exterior wall of a parking structure at a parking garage – originally designed by Frank Gehry. The whole array reflects distorted images of passersby.

(via the-honest-gentleman)

Glowing Earth

vvolare:

Illuminating the cracks beneath the earth by Lee Eunyol

(via en-lightning)

Sarah Sze opens at Victoria Miro
Everyday objects such as toothpicks, Q-tips, tape rolls, pushpins, tablets, birthday candles, etc. are meticulously arranged to create cascading conceptual constellations.  Whimsical and fastidious, banal bits and bobs from the utility closet and the bathroom cupboard become magical ecosystems. Sarah Sze’s installations examine the relationship between landscape, architecture, sculpture and line. 
Sarah Sze opens her second solo show with Victoria Miro today, June 20th. The show will remain open until August 11th.
“Over both floors, Sze’s latest body of work re-imagines the gallery as a kind of laboratory where processes of observation, examination, and exploration are in progress." - Victoria Miro 
The Guardian: “Sarah Sze: ‘I want people to stop and look at my art’”

Tracing Space: Anthony McCall

If you happen to be in Cologne, don’t make the mistake of missing an unforgettable experience at Anthony McCall’s exhibition at Galerie Thomas Zander. Since the 1970s, McCall’s reductivist installations mesmerize audiences.  It is hard to describe the experience in words, but to give a sense of this immersive artworks, one must speak to the artworks unfolding in time.  

A spectator walks from the bright outer gallery space into a pitch dark room, his eyes take time to adjust to the absolute darkness, but soon he realize there is a shaft of light streaming down evenly from above. This shaft is actually a line, a thin beam of light that is moving ever so slowly. The light line moves into different shapes, volume is created as the light reflects off of a light fog or dust that is fills the air, invisible until illuminated.  The lines move around one another at a constant pace, creating volumes, coming apart, making cones of light that threaten to pull you up into a UFO. At he forefront, his work is about the idea of exchange between different forms and how they engage with the body, but it is also about efficiency, using the most basic and simple elements for maximum effect.

See this video made by Tate that explains how is work is created in time:

McCall began making work during the rise of minimalism in the 70s in New York - he says at a time when artists were “looking for ways to render down an idea to it’s basic forms.”  He describes his work as somewhere between cinema, sculpture and drawing.  Cinemas, because they are pieces that are constructed in time, sculptures because they are three dimensional forms that invite the spectator to move around inside of them and drawing because, in essence, his works are simply an animated line drawing that is projected from the ceiling to the floor.

Anthony McCall’s website

Galerie Thomas Zander

Anthony McCall at the Serpentine Gallery

The Telegraph, Anthony McCall: Vertical Works, Ambika P3, London, review