New Stage for Dance - your iPad?

2wice, a visual and performing arts journal, is going digital. But not just putting print on a screen. The dance publication is producing performance art pieces made specifically to be experienced on the iPad.  Each performance is uniquely packaged in an app. 

2wice Fifth Wall App from Pentagram on Vimeo.

Patsy Tarr, director of the 2wice Arts Foundation, believes dance needs to go in the direction of mobile technology. The organization chose the iPad as their vehicle of change.

“The greatest thing that digital could add is the incorporation of video,” Tarr says. “And for dance, that’s just the whole thing. Instead of describing the dance in print in writing and a photograph, we could actually just show the dance.”

2wice released the Fifth Wall app in the Apple store (99 cents). For the production of Fifth Wall, black wooden planks were nailed together to make a sturdy rectangular box, proportional to the iPad’s miniature frame. The piece was then shot within this bespoke stage to translate to the digital format. The concept of Fifth Wall was dreamed up by 2wice’s art director Abbott Miller. The dance was choreographed and performed by Jonah Bokaer. 

The end result is a very interactive experience. By downloading the Fifth Wall app, iPad users can access four two-minute performances, which can be enjoyed individually or simultaneously.

The 2wice Arts Foundation is a nonprofit organization that supports the visual and performing arts. The Foundation, which began in 1989, has its headquarters in the legendary New York City Center. The work of the Foundation is to publish digital and print projects that focus on the intersection of photography, dance, design, performance, fashion, art and architecture.

Mobile Apps News: "Former print publication now produces iPad only performance art"

New Stage for Dance - your iPad?
2wice, a visual and performing arts journal, is going digital. But not just putting print on a screen. The dance publication is producing performance art pieces made specifically to be experienced on the iPad.  Each performance is uniquely packaged in an app. 

2wice Fifth Wall App from Pentagram on Vimeo.
Patsy Tarr, director of the 2wice Arts Foundation, believes dance needs to go in the direction of mobile technology. The organization chose the iPad as their vehicle of change.
“The greatest thing that digital could add is the incorporation of video,” Tarr says. “And for dance, that’s just the whole thing. Instead of describing the dance in print in writing and a photograph, we could actually just show the dance.”
2wice released the Fifth Wall app in the Apple store (99 cents). For the production of Fifth Wall, black wooden planks were nailed together to make a sturdy rectangular box, proportional to the iPad’s miniature frame. The piece was then shot within this bespoke stage to translate to the digital format. The concept of Fifth Wall was dreamed up by 2wice’s art director Abbott Miller. The dance was choreographed and performed by Jonah Bokaer. 
The end result is a very interactive experience. By downloading the Fifth Wall app, iPad users can access four two-minute performances, which can be enjoyed individually or simultaneously.
The 2wice Arts Foundation is a nonprofit organization that supports the visual and performing arts. The Foundation, which began in 1989, has its headquarters in the legendary New York City Center. The work of the Foundation is to publish digital and print projects that focus on the intersection of photography, dance, design, performance, fashion, art and architecture.
Mobile Apps News: "Former print publication now produces iPad only performance art"
Portishead x Chris Cunningham
This GIF is a clip from Chris Cunningham’s music video for the song “Only You” by Portishead.  The film showed gravity defying ethereal movements. Beth Gibbons and a young boy were shot in underwater tanks and then digitally reinserted into a street scene.  The lack of any bubbles and distinct sharpness of the light, make it almost impossible to make sense of visually.
To get free tickets to see Chris Cunningham’s latest work at Audi City London on July 19th & 20th follow @audicity on Twitter.
See the full video here.

Björk’s Gravitational Pull

All artists today must navigate between analog and digital, and make functional decisions about technology that determine aesthetics.  Björk is one such artist whose work directly addresses the intersection of technology and raw sound.  Andrew Marantz writes, “The most Goldbergian of contemporary pop musicians, the one who most elegantly splits the different between techno-worship and Luddism, is Björk, whose new album, “Biophilia,” is a meditation on creativity, the laws of physics, and how to make simple things complex.”

When Björk went to visit MIT Media Labs, the pre-eminent centre for out of the box, human-machine research, she met Andy Cavatorta.  He was a graduate student at the time and they immediately clicked.  He was hired to design a robotic instrument for her Biophilia tour that would harness the forces of nature: lightning, gravity and the Earth’s magnetic field. 

"I should mention that I’d already quit this business twice before I met Björk. While audiences loved the idea of music and robots together, it contains an aesthetic dead end. If the content of music is emotion, the Jungian unconscious, the deep mystery through which our raw atoms create meaning out of the chaos of the world, then robots possess nothing of what makes us care. I could see little place for them in music beyond fleeting novelty." Andy Cavatorta

In the end, they focused their energy on the Gravity Harp, that uses pendulums.  Pendulums are natural oscillators, that transfer gravitational energy into kinetic energy. The robotic pendulums, each containing a harp with eleven strings.  These pendulums hang in the air and swing slowly swing back and forth, in the pattern of a sine wave.  A long line of pendulums that each play one note.  The rhythm is determined by the energy of the earth’s gravity pulling the wooden instrument.

The New Yorker, “Inventing Björk’s gravity harp”

Origin Magazine, “Building Gravity Harps for Björk by Andy Cavatorta”

The Funambulist, “Björk and her beautiful gravity harps”

Demo of Björk’s Gravity Harps