Bjork x Chris Cunningham
Robot from the video “All is Full of Love”.  To get free tickets to see Chris Cunningham’s latest work at Audi City London on July 19th & 20th follow @audicity on Twitter and look out for our special tweets.

Monkey Drummer

Do we come from monkeys and are we turning into machines? This short film, Monkey Drummer, by Chris Cunningham, shows a figure with a monkey head and human appendages mechanically drumming a frenetic rhythm.  Each body part moves in an authentically human way but seems to be controlled by a machine.  

monkeydrummer from Mufzewell on Vimeo.

The film premiered at the Venice Biennale of Art in 2001.  The music is made by Aphex Twin and is the tenth track on their album, drukqs.  Sigtryggur Baldursson or “Siggi" of the Sugarcubes was shot several times drumming and then his torso was cut out in post production to be replaced by the robotic trunk.  

Win tickets to see Chris Cunningham’s latest work here.

Monkey Drummer
Do we come from monkeys and are we turning into machines? This short film, Monkey Drummer, by Chris Cunningham, shows a figure with a monkey head and human appendages mechanically drumming a frenetic rhythm.  Each body part moves in an authentically human way but seems to be controlled by a machine.  

monkeydrummer from Mufzewell on Vimeo.
The film premiered at the Venice Biennale of Art in 2001.  The music is made by Aphex Twin and is the tenth track on their album, drukqs.  Sigtryggur Baldursson or “Siggi" of the Sugarcubes was shot several times drumming and then his torso was cut out in post production to be replaced by the robotic trunk.  
Win tickets to see Chris Cunningham’s latest work here.
Portishead x Chris Cunningham
This GIF is a clip from Chris Cunningham’s music video for the song “Only You” by Portishead.  The film showed gravity defying ethereal movements. Beth Gibbons and a young boy were shot in underwater tanks and then digitally reinserted into a street scene.  The lack of any bubbles and distinct sharpness of the light, make it almost impossible to make sense of visually.
To get free tickets to see Chris Cunningham’s latest work at Audi City London on July 19th & 20th follow @audicity on Twitter.
See the full video here.

Chris Cunningham x Audi City

Chris Cunningham is a relentlessly experimental creator who defies categorisation. His work is shaped by the sci-fi films and electronic music he devoured in his youth.  The frenetic, wildly inventive music videos he made for Aphex Twin ( “Windowlicker”, “Come to Daddy”) and Bjork ( “All Is Full of Love”) redefined the form and has influenced high fashion, advertising, blockbuster movies and low-budget horror flicks alike over the last decade.

In recent years he has moved further away from the music video genre and now creates independent video works, which no longer have their starting point as commissions. His video and sound art has been shown in the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Venice Bienalle, the Barbican, the Anthony D’offay gallery amongst others and his live show at The Royal Opera House, The Roundhouse and Royal Festival Hall.

Chris has created his own disturbing visual language, that pits the grotesque imperfections of human anatomy against high technology embodied in robots and hallucinatory motion effects.  

Always driven forward by its ethos of Vorsprung durch Technik, Audi City is a new venture that uses technology to create space in the city centre. For five days in Mayfair, Audi reveals a site-specific installation of Chris Cunningham’s latest work.  Enormous industrial robots veer around one another in a mysterious room.  Their motors are syncopated with the room’s metronome and they embark on a frenetic interchange over a mechanical ‘brain’. 

Stay tuned for more information on the installation and how YOU can win tickets to experience this artwork.

Follow us on Twitter here.

Chris Cunningham x Audi City
Chris Cunningham is a relentlessly experimental creator who defies categorisation. His work is shaped by the sci-fi films and electronic music he devoured in his youth.  The frenetic, wildly inventive music videos he made for Aphex Twin ( “Windowlicker”, “Come to Daddy”) and Bjork ( “All Is Full of Love”) redefined the form and has influenced high fashion, advertising, blockbuster movies and low-budget horror flicks alike over the last decade.
In recent years he has moved further away from the music video genre and now creates independent video works, which no longer have their starting point as commissions. His video and sound art has been shown in the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Venice Bienalle, the Barbican, the Anthony D’offay gallery amongst others and his live show at The Royal Opera House, The Roundhouse and Royal Festival Hall.
Chris has created his own disturbing visual language, that pits the grotesque imperfections of human anatomy against high technology embodied in robots and hallucinatory motion effects.  
Always driven forward by its ethos of Vorsprung durch Technik, Audi City is a new venture that uses technology to create space in the city centre. For five days in Mayfair, Audi reveals a site-specific installation of Chris Cunningham’s latest work.  Enormous industrial robots veer around one another in a mysterious room.  Their motors are syncopated with the room’s metronome and they embark on a frenetic interchange over a mechanical ‘brain’. 
Stay tuned for more information on the installation and how YOU can win tickets to experience this artwork.
Follow us on Twitter here.
Welcome to Audi City

We are excited to announce the launch of Audi City, a new venture that uses technology to create space in the city centre. With over 50% of the world’s population living in urban areas, the city is becoming the prevalent framework for human living.  Using state-of-the-art equipment, Audi City bridges real space with virtual space expanding possibilities.  This blog is focused on this ethos.  Here we share fascinating projects from around the world which transform human interaction with space.  From artists who are interested in the experience of the body in the environment to ingenious technologies that present new possibilities for living, to reflections on the future of mobility.  
jaqapparatus by Chris Cunningham
For five days in Mayfair, London, Audi City revealed a site-specific installation of Chris Cunningham’s latest work. Tickets were given out on our Twitter @audicity.
Always driven forward by its ethos of Vorsprung durch Technik, Audi collaborated with award winning filmmaker and artist Chris Cunningham.  The work is the first in a series of multi-media works that mix complex live performance, music, robotics and sculpture.  Enormous industrial robots veer around one another in a mysterious room.  Their motors are syncopated with the room’s metronome and they embark on a frenetic interchange over a mechanical ‘brain’. 
Welcome to Audi City
We are excited to announce the launch of Audi City, a new venture that uses technology to create space in the city centre. With over 50% of the world’s population living in urban areas, the city is becoming the prevalent framework for human living.  Using state-of-the-art equipment, Audi City bridges real space with virtual space expanding possibilities.  This blog is focused on this ethos.  Here we share fascinating projects from around the world which transform human interaction with space.  From artists who are interested in the experience of the body in the environment to ingenious technologies that present new possibilities for living, to reflections on the future of mobility.  


jaqapparatus by Chris Cunningham


For five days in Mayfair, London, Audi City revealed a site-specific installation of Chris Cunningham’s latest work. Tickets were given out on our Twitter @audicity.


Always driven forward by its ethos of Vorsprung durch Technik, Audi collaborated with award winning filmmaker and artist Chris Cunningham.  The work is the first in a series of multi-media works that mix complex live performance, music, robotics and sculpture.  Enormous industrial robots veer around one another in a mysterious room.  Their motors are syncopated with the room’s metronome and they embark on a frenetic interchange over a mechanical ‘brain’.