Hexagonal System
An interesting way to divvy up space and avoid being boxed in!
archiveofaffinities:

Richard K. Thomas, Space-Partition System Based on Hexagonal Cells
Repetition in the work of Alvar Aalto
fiore-rosso:

alvar aalto | architecture d’aujourd’hui 93.

Shobana Jeyasingh, a prominent modern dance choreographer has long been creating dances in incredible spaces. Her new work is a mesmerising series of dances called Too Mortal, will take place in historic churches around Europe.  Rather than use the architecture of the church as a setting, Jeyasignh says it is more like a dance partner, instead of “site specific” the work is “site reactive.”

"The church is like something from a Jane Austen novel with these very tall, very dark, box pews… I’ve always envied film directors because they can make clean cuts between images.  In dance, when you create an image, you have to spend a lot of time thinking about how to get out of it.  The dancers have to physically untangle themselves and move on.  With these box pews, I realised I could edit in a new way.  I could instantly make the dancers appear and disappear." - Shobana Jeyasingh

The Guardian: “Shake the room: how architecture is inspiring dance”

Shobana Jeyasingh, a prominent modern dance choreographer has long been creating dances in incredible spaces. Her new work is a mesmerising series of dances called Too Mortal, will take place in historic churches around Europe.  Rather than use the architecture of the church as a setting, Jeyasignh says it is more like a dance partner, instead of “site specific” the work is “site reactive.”
"The church is like something from a Jane Austen novel with these very tall, very dark, box pews… I’ve always envied film directors because they can make clean cuts between images.  In dance, when you create an image, you have to spend a lot of time thinking about how to get out of it.  The dancers have to physically untangle themselves and move on.  With these box pews, I realised I could edit in a new way.  I could instantly make the dancers appear and disappear." - Shobana Jeyasingh
The Guardian: “Shake the room: how architecture is inspiring dance”
Desert canyon in Times Square
The world is flush these days with museum quality white cube shows in both commercial gallery and institutional spaces.  But also on the rise are artworks that utilise the city’s infrastructure as both a method of display and as a medium.
Every day from 11:57 pm to midnight, a sweeping image of desert landscapes fill 36 of the large outdoor video screens lining Times Square, covering 63,500 square feet of screen space.  This time based work is entitled Buoy and is a luminous tribute to the Californian desert on the other side of the land mass.  Made by Seoungho Cho, the work reflects on the polar extremes of this desert, which was once the floor of a vast sea, now traversed by sight-seeing tourists.
The video work changes the cacophonic ad space into an immersive art installation, alluding that the city itself is a canyon, crevices winding through tall cliffs of surrounding skyscrapers.  
The ephemeral piece is just three minutes long and will be showing until June 30th.
Times Square website
Huffington Post: “Times Square Desert-Scape”
EAI in Times Square

Art in your city: orb cloud descends on Gehry parking structure

This work entitled Cradle by Ball-Nogues Studio uses the surrounding cityscape as it’s subject. It doesn’t depict city life, but literally reflects it, making a mirrored sculptural collage of all the traffic, pedestrians, buildings and street lamps.

pulmonaire:

Commissioned by the City of Santa Monica, Cradle is situated on the exterior wall of a parking structure at a parking garage – originally designed by Frank Gehry. The whole array reflects distorted images of passersby.

(via the-honest-gentleman-deactivate)

Bubble building

The Stockholm Globe Arena, known as the Ericsson Globe is apparently the world’s largest round building. The globe is the national indoor arena and while built for ice hockey, has also hosted the Dalai Lama, Pope John Paul II and Nelson Mandela.

Inside there is a funicular railway to take passengers around the spherical architecture called the Skyview.  This transport apparatus is made up of a little glass orb which hoists passengers around  using ski lift technology in about 20 minutes, going about 130 metres high.  It is an incredible way to get a first class view of surrounding Stockholm through the syncopated windows. 

Bubble building
The Stockholm Globe Arena, known as the Ericsson Globe is apparently the world’s largest round building. The globe is the national indoor arena and while built for ice hockey, has also hosted the Dalai Lama, Pope John Paul II and Nelson Mandela.
Inside there is a funicular railway to take passengers around the spherical architecture called the Skyview.  This transport apparatus is made up of a little glass orb which hoists passengers around  using ski lift technology in about 20 minutes, going about 130 metres high.  It is an incredible way to get a first class view of surrounding Stockholm through the syncopated windows. 
Building Pattern

Plant-In City: talk to your plants

Plant-In City is a yet to occur modular plant art installation.  The New York designers, Huy Bui, Carlos Gomez and Jon Schramm are requesting support via Kickstarter for their project which ingeniously unites plant life, architecture and intelligent infrastructures.  Each frame communicates with the cloud, giving biological information about the plant habitats.  A human can also interact with the system through a smart phone, administering water and monitoring the plant’s environment.

The idea started with the simple problem of wanting to keep lush plants around the house, but worrying that a busy travel schedule would only result in dried stalks.  de Llarena, a media designer, thought - we live in an age where there is an app for that. So they decided to explore how technology could improve our relationships to plants.

The relatively simple idea grew more complex as they proceeded - and realised that sensors could tell us a lot more about the plant, and our own living environments.  By monitoring the plant’s air quality, we learn about what we are breathing.  Sensors in the irrigation system allow for water to be conserved.

To get involved via Kickstarter click here.

Wired: Plant-In City wants to use architecture to reimagine the way we live with plants

Gizmag: Horticulture, technology, architecture and art converge in Plant-In City project

Plant-In City: talk to your plants
Plant-In City is a yet to occur modular plant art installation.  The New York designers, Huy Bui, Carlos Gomez and Jon Schramm are requesting support via Kickstarter for their project which ingeniously unites plant life, architecture and intelligent infrastructures.  Each frame communicates with the cloud, giving biological information about the plant habitats.  A human can also interact with the system through a smart phone, administering water and monitoring the plant’s environment.
 
The idea started with the simple problem of wanting to keep lush plants around the house, but worrying that a busy travel schedule would only result in dried stalks.  de Llarena, a media designer, thought - we live in an age where there is an app for that. So they decided to explore how technology could improve our relationships to plants.
The relatively simple idea grew more complex as they proceeded - and realised that sensors could tell us a lot more about the plant, and our own living environments.  By monitoring the plant’s air quality, we learn about what we are breathing.  Sensors in the irrigation system allow for water to be conserved.
To get involved via Kickstarter click here.
Wired: Plant-In City wants to use architecture to reimagine the way we live with plants
Gizmag: Horticulture, technology, architecture and art converge in Plant-In City project
Glowing market stalls
designsuppe:

Temporary Market Halls in Madrid by Nieto Sobejano Arquitectos