The Great Escape
Norway’s capital city is thriving. And from its roots as a former shipyard to its modern urban reputation, the waters of Oslofjord frame a city that’s as beautiful as it is forward-thinking.
Learn more about one of Europe’s fastest developing cities in the latest edition of Audi Magazine: http://bit.ly/WinterAudiMagazine 
Rio coming up
Rio de Janeiro, known for its beautiful beaches and hard bodies, will come into itsown as a truly global city when it hosts upcoming international events, including the 2012 Rio +20 Conference, the 2014 FIFA World Cup and the 2016 Olympic Games. 

Architecture with Biological Response

joshbyard:

An Engineer’s Plan to Use Swarm Robots to Make Smart Buildings Behave More Like  Super-Organisms

Using swarms of robotic sensors that “chase” a structure’s human occupants, he wants buildings to understand everything about us, down to our emotional state.

These robot sensors will learn from their mistakes, self-regulate using digital “hormones”, and record information over the course of years, building up a record of experiences to be used as “DNA” to program future versions of themselves, or even other buildings.

“Living organisms give birth to the next generation, and have immunity to viruses such as influenza,” says Mita in a video promoting his work. “Our idea was that we wanted to give architecture this kind of biological response capability.”

(via BBC - Future - Technology - Robot swarms aim to bring buildings to life ht Kurzweil AI)

Architecture with Biological Response
joshbyard:

An Engineer’s Plan to Use Swarm Robots to Make Smart Buildings Behave More Like  Super-Organisms

Using swarms of robotic sensors that “chase” a structure’s human occupants, he wants buildings to understand everything about us, down to our emotional state.
These robot sensors will learn from their mistakes, self-regulate using digital “hormones”, and record information over the course of years, building up a record of experiences to be used as “DNA” to program future versions of themselves, or even other buildings.
“Living organisms give birth to the next generation, and have immunity to viruses such as influenza,” says Mita in a video promoting his work. “Our idea was that we wanted to give architecture this kind of biological response capability.”

(via BBC - Future - Technology - Robot swarms aim to bring buildings to life ht Kurzweil AI)

Serpentine Pavilion

designed by Herzon & de Meuron and Ai Weiwei

The inner shape and volume underneath the flat pool of water are defined by the footprints of all the previous pavilions.

"Their shape varies: circular, long and narrow, dots and also large, constructed hollows that have been filled in… These remains testify to the existence of the former Pavilions and their greater or lesser intervention in the natural environment of the park."

Zaha Hadid’s Z Boat 


Commissioned by art dealer Kenny Schacter, “The asymmetrical design is sculptural in appearance while practically affording more seating accommodations. In a sense, the bespoke boat is as much a work of art as a Cisitalia sports car in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. The idea is to think of vessels and vehicles as highly individualistic expressions of art, architecture and design reflecting the edge of what is possible using the most advanced means, including materials, software systems and methods of fabrication.” - Zaha Hadid

Zaha Hadid’s Z Boat 

Commissioned by art dealer Kenny Schacter, “The asymmetrical design is sculptural in appearance while practically affording more seating accommodations. In a sense, the bespoke boat is as much a work of art as a Cisitalia sports car in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. The idea is to think of vessels and vehicles as highly individualistic expressions of art, architecture and design reflecting the edge of what is possible using the most advanced means, including materials, software systems and methods of fabrication.” - Zaha Hadid

Networked Cities

Computer networks are merging with the physical infrastructure of the city in order to track how people use the city space.  This makes once passive objects, like streets, active producers of data informing decisions about urban planning and policy. Embedded sensors are currently producing a large amount of data.  The network technology can visualise city traffic flow, see where people move during the day, see how people use their cell phones as they are on the move, track criminal activity and allow us to communicate with one another. As Popupcity.net notes, “Often this data is not stored or collected. Often it is stored without being shared.”  We are just beginning to explore the possibilities of a networked city, where ”objects will cease being passive and evolve into being active, responding to activity happening in real time and facilitating and contributing to networks of social exchange and discourse, rearranging the rules of occupancy and patterns of mobility within the physical world.”

"We are surrounded by objects and spaces that have their own network and identity. their own informational shadow… Our urban places are increasingly becoming characterised in formats that are machine readable, human readable.  They are telling us about themselves. They are speaking themselves to us. We are surrounded by objects that are capable of gathering, processing, transmitting information." - Adam Greenfield

His company Urbanscale makes cities easier to understand, more pleasant to use and live in and more responsive to the desires of their inhabitants.

A talk from Adam Greenfield that gives a good overview of how public objects can be connected - click here to watch.

An essay presenting possibilities for the networked city:  A Manifesto for Networked Objects - Cohabitating with Pigeons, Arphids, Aibos in the Internet of Things

Networked Cities
Computer networks are merging with the physical infrastructure of the city in order to track how people use the city space.  This makes once passive objects, like streets, active producers of data informing decisions about urban planning and policy. Embedded sensors are currently producing a large amount of data.  The network technology can visualise city traffic flow, see where people move during the day, see how people use their cell phones as they are on the move, track criminal activity and allow us to communicate with one another. As Popupcity.net notes, “Often this data is not stored or collected. Often it is stored without being shared.”  We are just beginning to explore the possibilities of a networked city, where ”objects will cease being passive and evolve into being active, responding to activity happening in real time and facilitating and contributing to networks of social exchange and discourse, rearranging the rules of occupancy and patterns of mobility within the physical world.”
"We are surrounded by objects and spaces that have their own network and identity. their own informational shadow… Our urban places are increasingly becoming characterised in formats that are machine readable, human readable.  They are telling us about themselves. They are speaking themselves to us. We are surrounded by objects that are capable of gathering, processing, transmitting information." - Adam Greenfield
His company Urbanscale makes cities easier to understand, more pleasant to use and live in and more responsive to the desires of their inhabitants.
A talk from Adam Greenfield that gives a good overview of how public objects can be connected - click here to watch.
An essay presenting possibilities for the networked city:  A Manifesto for Networked Objects - Cohabitating with Pigeons, Arphids, Aibos in the Internet of Things